The sun never sets in PyeongChang

The excitement for PyeongChang 2018 is building up. With promotional campaigns and new announcements about PyeongChang, people, both in Korea and in the globe, are starting to pay more attention to what is happening there. But we often forget about the advanced technology at work behind the scenes that bring the Olympic Games to life. What does PyeongChang look like, from the technology perspective? Here’s what a day at PyeongChang might look like, if you’re paying attention to the technologies hidden behind the scenes.

On the way to
PyeongChang
On the way to
PyeongChang

Incheon International Airport and other airports in Korea are flooded with visitors from around the world heading toward PyeongChang. They are a hive of activity, gathering Olympians who will be competing at the Games, to their coaching staff, journalists, key dignitaries, celebrities, and spectators who have traveled close and far to watch the Olympic events in person. An aircraft powered by GE engine takes flight every 2 seconds, and it’s not to difficult to spot planes powered by GE’s aviation technology among numerous aircrafts bound for Korea.

In February 2018, there will be 102 events across 15 disciplines taking place in PyeongChang, Gangneung, and Jeongseon. Going from Incheon Airport to Jinbu Station – the closest KTX (Korea Train express) station to PyeongChang Mountain Cluster – merely in 98 minutes, the new KTX train will carry countless visitors to PyeongChang and Gangneung. Jinbu Station was built specially for PyeongChang 2018, and 51 trains will pass through the station every day. Leading the transportation industry by connecting locomotives with the industrial internet, GE is dedicated to the successful operation of the Games. When it comes to sustainability, it’s not just about renewables. It’s about increasing the operational efficiency of aircraft engines and of locomotives, for a more positive impact on the environment.

Supporting the
Olympians
Supporting the
Olympians

Olympians from all over the world go through years of blood, sweat and tears in preparation for the Olympic Games. It’s probably because we understand their dedication, passion and their endurance that we admire each and every play.

The Olympic Games venues where Olympians, workforce and spectators gather together require massive amounts of electricity. What’s important is not only the amount of power that is supplied to the venue, but that power supply is continuous. If the power supply gets cut off or becomes unstable, Olympians participating in the event will not be able to perform at their best. In the worst case scenario, it may result in serious accidents. Therefore, it is critical that there is a power protection technology in place, that allows the power supply to be stable even in emergencies.

For PyeongChang 2018, GE has installed uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) at every venue to secure continuous distribution of power to the venues. GE is also deploying a team of experts to meticulously monitor the status of the UPS systems and to respond swiftly to any potential emergencies. GE experts will conduct a continuous analysis of data collected on site to provide a stable supply of high-quality electricity and prevent power related accidents.

Delivering the Olympic
experience to
viewers around
the world
Delivering the Olympic
experience to
viewers around
the world

At the Games, how well the game is broadcast to viewers around the world is just as important as the game itself. Billions of viewers worldwide are inspired by the Games to find their dreams and aspirations.

To deliver ultra high-definition (UHD) video footage of the Games to viewers around the world, more than 6,000 broadcasters and journalists from around the world work tirelessly day and night at the International Broadcasting Center (IBC). The IBC is equipped with GE’s power distribution solutions, including MV switchgear, transformers and ATS, which play a vital role in delivering the Olympic experience to billions of viewers with clarity and in real-time.

GE’s MV switchgear, which controls and protects electrical equipment and utility applications with digital protection relay as well as digital temperature and humidity meters, helps minimize the effect temperature has on the equipment and helps reduce the likelihood of equipment malfunction during the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018. The ATS monitors, controls, and switches the MV Switchgear to help prevent power supply interruption, and is based on a programmable logic controller (PLC) designed to operate seamlessly following initial programming.

“Smart-energy”
Olympic Games
“Smart-energy”
Olympic Games

As a Worldwide Partner of the Olympic Games, GE is also providing an energy monitoring system (EMS) for the first time in the 122 years of Olympic history. GE Digital, the provider of the world’s first Industrial Internet platform Predix, will build a system based on its industrial big data technology, including SCADA and Historian data collection solutions, to monitor and analyze the power supply and consumption of 16 Olympic Games venues on a real-time basis. GE is expected to support the first ‘Smart Energy’ Olympic Games by providing a solution to monitor more reliable energy and efficient operation of the Games.

The EMS offers real-time visibility of energy management and enables prompt diagnosis for quick problem solving in the case of power failures that may occur anywhere between the Olympic Games Stadiums and live-broadcasting, where reliable energy is crucial. The Main Operations Center of POCOG is expected to enhance its capability as a control tower utilizing the EMS with eyes on energy operation every second. As the operators remotely monitor energy from the Main Operations Center, the response speed to the power failures is expected to be significantly enhanced.

에너지모니터링시스템 (Energy Monitoring System, EMS)
Medical technology
and services

the Olympians need
Medical technology
and services

the Olympians need

As a Worldwide Partner of the Olympic Games, GE is providing advanced medical technology and expertise to the Polyclinic, a hospital within the Olympic Village for Olympians and volunteers participating in the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018. GE will be providing two digital mobile X-ray units (Optima XR 220amx), four diagnostic ultrasound machines (Logiq E Premium R7), four patient monitors (Carescape B450), and one set of PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System, Centricity PACS) at the Olympic Polyclinic in PyeongChang and Gangneung, as well as medical stations in Bokwang and Jeongson. GE’s Centricity PACS solution allows clinicians to access the medical images on their PC and their mobile anytime, anywhere, which is important for providing optimal care at the Olympic Games, where the venues are dispersed. Logiq E Premium R7, a mobile ultrasound machine, is specialized in musculoskeletal and sports injuries, with easy portability that enables real-time care, and Optima XR 220amx, a digital mobile X-ray system, is 25~35% smaller than previous mobile X-ray units for easy maneuverability throughout the Polyclinic. GE will also provide the Athlete Management Solution (AMS), which provides real-time dashboards that can help medical staff based on both medical records and sport-specific information, to enable individualized care for the Olympians.

Medical technology and services the Olympians need
MENU

PyeongChang2018 and GE